Category: Uncategorized

What is Lymphoedema & How A Lymphoedema Physiotherapist Can Help

Fluid from the body’s tissues drains into the lymphatic vessels, which are close to the blood vessels. This fluid is called lymph. Lymphatic vessels carry the lymph fluid to lymph nodes where substances that could be harmful, such as bacteria, are filtered out and destroyed. This process helps to protect the body against infection. The […]

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Incidental Exercise: A Healthy Habit that Can Improve Your Pain

We all know exercise is important for maintaining a healthy lifestyle. The latest guidelines suggest we should be accumulating 2 ½ to 5 hours of moderate intensity exercise, or 1 ¼ to 2 ½ hours of vigorous intensity exercise a week. However our habits throughout the rest of the day might be undoing this hard work. […]

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Have You Trained Enough to Safely Return to Playing Sport?

The biggest risk factor for acquiring an injury during sport is having previously had that injury whilst playing. This is the same for any muscle/tendon/ligament/bone injuries. For example, having rolled an ankle playing basketball makes you significantly more likely to roll it again when playing basketball. Another common example is the runner who experiences pain […]

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Why You Need To See A Physiotherapist After Straining Your Hamstring

The hamstrings are a group of three muscles located in the back of the thigh (Figure1). The muscles extend from the bottom of the pelvis, down to the back of the knee. The hamstring muscles work to extend the hip and bend the knee, so are important in activities such as walking, running, squatting and […]

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What is the Pelvic Floor & How Does It Influence Continence & Prolapse?

What is the pelvic floor? The pelvic floor is a group of muscles and ligaments that support the bladder, uterus and bowel. The pelvic floor is an important component of the core – working in conjunction with the back, diaphragm and abdominal muscles to stabilise the trunk. The pelvic floor muscles have two layers – […]

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